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  • Welkom op Newfoundland :: Colofon
    Neeleman teksten Edwin Neeleman contactpersoon Edwin Neeleman e mail technische info Deze website is getest in de browsers Internet Explorer 6 0 en Mozilla Firefox 3 0 8 en is ontworpen voor schermresoluties van 1440x900 of 1024x768 Voor een optimale werking van de website dient uw browser het gebruik van JavaScript te ondersteunen Disclaimer Deze website is met de grootst mogelijke zorg samengesteld Toch aanvaardt de maker van de website

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/nl/colofon.php (2016-02-06)
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  • Welcome to Newfoundland :: Economy :: agriculture
    Photos Washed Ashore Blow Me Down Drift wood Reflection Quartet Water and Cobbles Contact Agriculture Bakeapple Industry and Economy Economy Agriculture Fisheries Forestry Mining and Oil Services Farming is of minor importance in the economy of Newfoundland The poor soil and a short growing season discourage the raising of most crops Agriculture in Newfoundland is limited to areas south of St John s near Deer Lake and in the Codroy

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/en/agriculture.php (2016-02-06)
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  • Welkom op Newfoundland :: Economy :: fisheries
    the society they built For two hundred years the fishery was carried on mainly as a seasonal enterprise from ports on the other side of the Atlantic but in the long term it became advantageous for Great Britain to have a fishery based in Newfoundland Traditionally fishing was an inshore industry Most fishers sailed or rowed in small open boats from their home communities to nearby fishing grounds and brought back their catch to be processed split salted and tended while drying by the whole family In the 1880s at the peak of this traditional fishery two hundred thousand people were spread along 6 000 miles of rugged coastline mostly in small outport settlements Ninety per cent of the male work force was engaged in fishery related work and Newfoundland had an apparently secure position as the world s largest exporter of salt codfish Fishing boat Jackson s Arm August 2006 Before 1930 the province s chief fish products were salted and sun cured cod The advent of quick freezing after 1930 brought about a major shift in the industry with declining world demand for cured cod and rising demand for fresh frozen fish products Within a few years the province s antiquated fishing fleet along with increased competition from foreign fishers led to a sharp decline in commercial fishing After World War II the federal and provincial governments provided funds to modernize and expand the fishing fleet and the province s fishers prospered until the late 1960s Then fish stocks began to decline as a result of overfishing by both the domestic fleet and foreign fleets The creation in 1977 of an exclusive Canadian fishing zone extending 200 nautical miles 370 km 230 mi from the coast helped curtail foreign competition but did not reverse the declining fish stocks

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/en/fisheries.php (2016-02-06)
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  • Welkom op Newfoundland :: Economie :: forestry - pulp and paper industry
    early 1960s when mining surpassed forestry in economic importance about 30 percent of Newfoundland s land area was still forested The forests consist predominantly of such softwoods as black spruce and balsam fir which are ideal for making pulp and paper Newsprint is the principal use of the province s wood products The pulp and paper industry began in the province in 1909 when a large mill opened at Grand

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/en/forestry.php (2016-02-06)
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  • Welcome to Newfoundland :: Economy :: mining and oil production
    also mined in the province including silver gold lead copper and zinc Major mines in Labrador are the iron ore mine at Wabush Labrador City and the new nickel mine at Voisey s Bay Iron mining in Newfoundland began on Bell Island in the 1890s but ceased in that area in 1966 A new mine at Duck Pond 30 kilometers 18 mi south of the now closed mine at Buchans started producing copper zinc silver and gold in 2007 In recent years oil production from offshore oil platforms has expanded rapidly In 1979 the Hibernia oil field was discovered in the Grand Banks region about 310 km 190 mi off the coast of Newfoundland the first major oil discovery in Canadian coastal waters The production of oil from a platform at Hibernia began in 1997 A second offshore platform at the Terra Nova oil field began operations in 2001 A third offshore facility began production in 2007 at the White Rose oil field Tilt Cove May 2004 Settled around 1813 or earlier Tilt Cove was a tiny fishing settlement with a population of about 25 In 1857 Smith McKay discovered rich deposits of copper ore and in 1864 in conjunction

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/en/mining.php (2016-02-06)
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  • Welcome to Newfoundland :: Economy :: services
    lounge Sandyville Houses into decay Seaweed Photos Washed Ashore Blow Me Down Drift wood Reflection Quartet Water and Cobbles Contact Services Cape Spear September 2008 Industry and Economy Economy Agriculture Fisheries Forestry Mining and Oil Services Service industries make up the largest sector of Newfoundland and Labrador s economy contributing approximately three fifths of the GDP Service industries are largely concentrated in St John s and include such activities as

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/en/services.php (2016-02-06)
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  • Welcome to Newfoundland :: Weather and climate
    in Newfoundland however are most delightful With afternoon highs in the low twenties they are warm enough to be comfortable and yet cool enough to permit vigorous activity The highest temperature ever recorded on the island is 36 7 C occuring at Botwood on August 22 1976 A red sky at night is a sailors delight a red sky in morning is a sailors warning For generations Newfoundland fisherman have been able to predict the weather from watching things in nature New Ferroles 2006 The tourist season on Newfoundland tends to run from June 1 till the end of August This does not mean that September or October are not convenient periods to visit Newfoundland On the contrary late summer and early fall frequently offer splendid weather conditions Maximum temperatures can climb to over 15 C at day time At night the temperature may well drop below the freezing point November is usually very wet and stormy Winter temperatures in Newfoundland show the day to day variability that is characteristic of a stormy maritime climate Incursions of moist mild Atlantic air are frequent There is also a noticeable difference between inland and coastal temperatures ln the interior winter temperatures average between 6 C and 10 C whereas on the southeast coast where the moderating influence of the ocean is greatest the winter average is between 2 C and 4 C Spring comes rather slowly and is short There is a big chance on frost at night time until the first week of June Wind and Storm Newfoundland as a whole has the strongest winds of any Canadian province with most stations recording average annual wind speeds greater than 20 km h Generally coastal stations have stronger winds than inland stations Winter is decidedly windier than summer Bonavista on the East Coast is the windiest location with an average annual wind speed of 28 km h St Albans in the sheltered Bay d Espoir on the south coast is the least windy location with an average yearly speed of 11 5 km h Prevailing wind directions are west in winter and west southwest in summer Many of the storms that cross North America during the year from west to east or develop and intensify off the East Coast of the United States pass near the island while they move out to the North Atlantic The result is that Newfoundland has a deserved reputation as one of the stormiest parts of the continent The severity and frequency of storms is greatest between November and March although they may occur at any time of the year During the summer and early fall Newfoundland weather is typically less stormy However in the fall tropical storms spawned near the equator and developed in the Caribbean may bring windy wet weather while they pass by the island before dying or redeveloping in the North Atlantic Over the past thirty five years an average of one tropical storm per year has passed within 300 km of Newfoundland

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/en/climate.php (2016-02-06)
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  • Welcome to Newfoundland :: Icebergs
    icebergs drift along in the cold waters of the Labrador Current onto the Grand Banks a route known as Iceberg Alley Icebergs have been counted and tracked since the sinking of the Titanic in 1912 Although 250 is an average number the yearly extremes have ranged from none in 1966 to 2202 in 1984 The best time of year to see icebergs is between the spring and early summer season from April till June Popular places to view icebergs are Bay Bulls Witless Bay St John s Cape Spear Bonavista Twillingate La Scie and St Anthony The icebergs seen off the coast of Newfoundland originate from the ancient glaciers of Greenland These glaciers contain ice which is said to be between 10 000 to 15 000 years old Iceberg near Conche July 2002 Ice shelves from the glaciers break off in pieces and fall into the sea a process called calving and an iceberg is born From here an iceberg begins its 2 3 year journey ultimately southwards They first head north picked up by the currents and ushered into Baffin Bay where they will spend their first winter locked in by pack ice Come spring and once the pack

    Original URL path: http://newfoundland.hilwin.nl/PHP/en/icebergs.php (2016-02-06)
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